Chicken Livers, Onions, Shallots, Mushrooms, Red Beans, White Rice, Pappardelle — a look

I love chicken livers over rice and I also love red beans and rice and I also love mushrooms and rice. There’s very few in the list of vegetables singularly over rice that I don’t like, like, broccoli, peas, onions, potatoes, sun-dried tomatoes, green string beans; and of course, chicken livers and red beans aren’t even really vegetables, except that someone in a rice kitchen might allow for it. (I know that’s uncouth today. I prefer the old tradition of allowing light meat substances in the vegan kitchen — I’m always saying this.)

And well — I’m not a very accomplished cook standing alone in bare feet so I can’t say if I know that you can make a real white rice melange smothered in chicken livers, onions, mushrooms, AND red beans. I never see the red beans paired in with chicken livers on the rest of this onions/mushrooms combo.

But finally, since I don’t have a solution for my question and all I could think of today was all of these ingredients in a rice bowl, I pulled together a few good recipe links for rice and some of these key ingredients.

Never found what I was actually looking for.

Easy Rice with Chicken Livers | Tasty Kitchen

Chicken Livers Baked Rice | Recipe Goldmine

Chicken Livers with Rice | Food.com

Mushroom Rice with Onion & Shallots

Mushroom Wild Rice Pilaf | Betty Crocker

Spicy Mushroom Rice | Food.com

Potato and Basmati Rice Pilaf | The Spruce Eats (Shown)

And, since I love red beans and rice probably as much as liver, onion, mushrooms and rice, I thought I would just post a page of 10 different red beans and rice recipes from The Spruce Eats, here; Red Beans and Rice!

But nothing chicken liver, onions, mushrooms and red beans over rice — whether it’s saffron rice or white rice, either.

(I don’t think dirty rice is the same thing. So I’ve also included a dirty rice recipe.)

Classic Cajun Dirty Rice | The Spruce Eats (Shown)

This does not even compare; it’s ingredients are entirely different. Even though dirty rice is a delicious rice dish, it isn’t anything like combining chicken livers, onions and mushrooms with red beans and rice.

So to solve my problem, and to continue to prove my ineffectiveness as a cook — I thought I’d show how I typically might try to get out of this craving. I’ve found two more excellent recipes — one for red beans and rice, and another for pasta with mushrooms and chicken livers and shallots. I was thinking of adding rice to rice. But instead, I found that maybe the total ineffective nature of the idea is better to show, rather than make it believable and lead people astray. I honestly don’t think you could combine these two recipes and win.

But for the sake of the argument. Using these two recipes following, I make a few suggested amendments.

Red Beans and Rice Recipe | Bon Appetit

Pappardelle with Chicken Livers and Mushrooms (and Shallots) | Food and Wine

Not exactly what anyone means by fusion cooking probably, but honestly, if you prepare the red beans with long grain wild rice instead of long grain white rice, it is a possibility to share the plate with the pappardelle, especially if, you’re willing to chop up your pappardelle into small bits. And finally, finishing off the red beans and wild rice pilaf and keeping it aside, and finished off the topping for the pappardelle; and, chopping up the pappardelle into small fragments like 2 inches (with a knife once they’re cooked), there’s nothing to stop anyone from adding the chicken livers toppings over onto the wild rice pilaf and beans, mixing it all like a salad and throwing the chopped papardelle on top and remixing again like a salad.

It’s probably not worth remembering again.

It would probably be more valuable to saute all the pasta toppings including all the ingredients for the red beans and rice (without any rice), steam the wild rice, steam the pappardelle, chop the pappardelle and then put it all together like a salad.

Well I tried. (I promised myself to be a cooking disaster every once in a while so no one believes I am not sharing because I don’t want to.)

 

 

 

Misson Ribs: Oven Styled

The Comforted Table

The final product – the roasted ribs are at the forefront while the steamed ribs are furthest away. Garnishes of parsley bring some green to the dish and echo with a parsley salad that can be served with heavy barbeque to cut through the richness of the meat.

Sometimes life throws you a curve ball. I had intended to spend this weekend making a number of beef and vegetarian dishes as dictated by a fairly new habit I had formed in creating a twitter poll to dictate my food experimentation for the week. However, that was before the 8 inches of snow covering our yard and the emptied out grocery store shelves.

I started digging around and found some St. Louis style pork ribs, and a friend of mine had just had a conversation with me earlier in the week about her rib woes. Despite many trial and errors, she…

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Sliders: Sliding into Comfort

The Comforted Table

By Michael Araj

The burger. Is it the perfect food? It’s hand held, it’s meaty, and it’s topped with salad on it half the time (yes, lettuce, tomato and onion counts as a salad in my book). It is the ultimate blank canvas. The ultimate piece of art.

We made sliders for the Superbowl this year (along with the chicken wings), and they did not disappoint. We used the buffalo sauce from the wings recipe as well as a condiment with some fresh mozzarella. This recipe allows you to innovate and improvise as much as you want. Going Whole30? In one of the photos, you’ll see that we replaced the dinner rolls for butter leaf lettuce, and replaced the cheese and buffalo sauce for a tomato salad on top.

So give this recipe a shot and create your own piece of art.

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ pounds fresh ground beef…

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Paella: The One Dish Wonder

The Comforted Table

My parents decided to throw a dinner party last weekend, and while my mother and I discussed what to serve, paella came to mind for several reasons. It’s filling, it has great flavor, and while not difficult to make, it appears a labor of hard toil.

Few things on a table are, perhaps, as awe inspiring as a paella. This Spanish dish steeped in rich history and even richer flavor is the ultimate comfort food. With versatility of ingredients, you can really make this into whatever you want it to be and your guests will be impressed.

Paellas come in lots of shapes and sizes, though a traditional paella also has chorizo instead of chicken. Because several of our friends coming to dinner do not eat pork for religious reasons, I substituted the chorizo for chicken thighs. You’ll also notice that this recipe is meant to serve a lot of…

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Feeling Crabby? She-crab Soup

The Comforted Table

By Michael Araj

There is a restaurant local to where I work that serves She-crab soup every Friday for its special. While She-crab soup, of course, is in itself special, nobody seems to agree on much about it, what should (and just as importantly, should not) go into its preparation.

The orange tint of most of the she-crab soups that are made come from the crab roe addition to it; however, this can be difficult to find due to crabbing laws and geography depending on where you’re located. Some people add crumbled hard boiled yolks to imitate the texture, others find this sacrilegious.

One thing almost everyone does agree on is that there is something comforting about a seafood bisque-like soup that invokes images of warmth, comfort and sunshine. Below, you’ll find our own recipe for crab bisque. We used Maryland blue crab and seafood stock that was leftover from…

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Falling into Autumn: Butternut Squash Stew

The Comforted Table

By Michael Araj

Despite the hot heat, fall has arrived with its abundance of autumn squashes and warm flavors, not to mention the colors. This warming stew keeps quite a while and increases in flavor the longer it melds. While it’s not a quick meal to cook during the week, it’s a great Sunday prep meal, freezes well, and can be eaten throughout the week.

As always, the first step is to get all your ingredients in place, or mise en place. This helps prevent me from looking like a chicken with its head cut off in the middle of my cooking since everything is ready to use.

Now it’s time to start cooking! Let’s heat up some oil and start cooking down the jalepenos, garlic and peppers!

Now time for the squash – the ultimate feel of fall. When you add the spices, after a few minutes, your kitchen…

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